Phenology Log 2020

Spring 2020

  • April 6 – 4 bluebird eggs appear in the nest on our lot. First green leaves of forest trees emerge.
  • April 5 – First mayapples coming up above the forest floor also within the span of just a few days of when they did in the past five years.
  • April 4 – The forest bottoms of Innsbrook are now showing a hint of green rising up above the blanket of last year’s fallen leaves. Nursery stock red maples are the first to show tiny leaves as they always have in previous years.
  • April 3 – First group of yellow finches of the year arrive at our birdfeeder.
  • April 2 – First tiny tent moths found on tree with its larvae occupants cocooned in their protection awaiting the first tender green leaves sprouting before the caterpillars emerge to strip the branches bare and then they too become rich meals for birds.
  • April 1 – First tick of the season found on pet the same week as most of the previous five years. Dogwoods deep inside the forest are now blooming in earnest.
  • March 31 – Red bud trees have started to show fragile violet buds. Slugs are seen crossing the road for the first time this year. The first yellow of dandelions appear. All these about one week earlier than last year. Spring will soon be exploding to display all of the glory of Nature regardless of the tragic nightmare of the coronavirus pandemic. Thank you Nature.
  • March 30 – I think I have never heard so many birds singing and chirping and calling and frolicking as I have this morning on our walk. We think that living with the pandemic makes us appreciate the sounds and serenity of nature at Innsbrook all that much more.
  • March 29 – Bradford pears, despite being an invasive tree, are flowering and their beauty is especially appreciated during the time of the coronavirus pandemic.
  • March 28 – The first buds of dogwood trees are flowering right within a few days of each of the lasts few years.
  • March 27 – Zillions of worms are crossing Innsbrook roads with all the recent rains. The robins must be happy!
  • March 26 – The first day of the year with temperatures reaching 80 degrees a week earlier than last year which was earlier than the previous year.
  • March 25 – Loons heard for the first time this season on our lake at sunrise.
  • March 24 – The first snail seen crossing a road.
  • March 23 – It feels as if nature seems to know that humanity is experiencing a pandemic not seen for over 100 years. Wildlife like deer stare at us longer with their huge rather sad looking eyes without ever flinching as we walk by. The budding and greening of flora seems to have come to a halt with the much wetter and cooler weather.
  • March 22 – First white petals on our neighbors magnolia tree.
  • March 17 – Many forest understory bushes now budding out
  • March 16 – First buds on nursery maples
  • March 10 – Peeper frogs heard for the first time, also weeks earlier than last year. Purple wild vinca flowers seen two weeks earlier than last year and nearly a month earlier than two years ago.
  • March 9 – With more warm weather forest wild daffodils starting to bloom nearly two weeks earlier than last year
  • March 8 – Spiders seen scurrying across roads
  • March 7 – Wild thorny gooseberry bushes have tiny green buds
  • March 1 – Near record heat of 71 degrees for the first day of March.
  • Feb. 29 – Forest wild daffodils are about 3 inches tall already.
  • Feb. 26 – First group of robins seem romping across the grassy forest edge areas
  • Feb. 25 – First worms and frogs seen crossing roads after heavy rains in warm temperatures that should have been snow this time of the year.
  • Feb. 19 – The first wild onions rise above fallen leaves along forest edges.
  • Feb. 4 – More warm temps in the 70s bring moths out of all things
  • Feb. 2 – Record warm temperature of 70 degrees, over 40 degrees above normal
  • Jan. 24 – Most precipitation this winter has been rain or sleet, instead of snow
  • Jan. 16 – Daffodils are already 2 inches above ground mulch
  • Jan.  17 – First pair of bluebirds seen cavorting near a birdhouse, way too early.
  • Jan. 11 – A two day period where we experience near record warmth, then thunderstorms, tornado warnings, 5 inces of rain, sleet, snow and ice.
  • Jan. 4 – Wild onions, small wild bush buds, and even daffodils are starting to poke up way too early
  • Jan. 1 – So far an unseasonably warm winter with most days above freezing